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These Women Are About to Make History as the Organizers of the Women's March on Washington

"This is not just a moment; this is a movement," says Sarah Sophie Flicker, one of the national organizers of the Women's March on Washington. It's a demonstration of solidarity, a mass mobilization of men and women alike, and a galvanizing moment for activists new and veteran alike. Here, get to know six of the accomplished women behind the movement, which is poised to be the biggest demonstration taking place in the capital during the inauguration of Donald Trump.

Released on 1/19/2017

Transcript

00:01
We're not only embarking
00:02
on the largest mass mobilization
00:03
that any new administration has ever seen
00:05
in history,
00:06
we're also putting together,
00:07
I believe, the first intersectional mobilization
00:10
which brings in environmental and climate justice,
00:13
racial justice, immigrant rights and immigration,
00:16
women's rights, women's reproductive right.
00:18
This is not just a moment.
00:20
This is a movement.
00:22
At 7 p.m. the night of the election
00:25
my six-year-old came up to me
00:27
and said Mama, tell Hillary Clinton I'm sorry.
00:31
I just said,
00:32
Oh, this is just the beginning of the evening.
00:35
No one thought that was going to happen.
00:39
We as a nation were not in touch
00:41
with each other
00:42
and are not in touch with each other
00:43
in the way we need to be.
00:45
I don't know if I want to frame it
00:46
that Donald Trump helps anybody do anything
00:48
but it has outraged people enough
00:50
that their outrage is being translated
00:52
into wanting to be more active.
00:54
A lot of women are coming to the table
00:56
saying I had no idea that racism was still
00:58
as it is today.
00:59
I had no idea, misogyny.
01:01
I didn't know it was this deep,
01:03
and now I understand.
01:05
Every one of us has a time and a moment
01:07
when we can plug into the movement.
01:10
Women are coming together
01:11
from all different walks of life
01:12
cross race, cross gender, cross issue.
01:16
We came up with the idea of
01:18
let's do a march on Washington
01:19
on inauguration day weekend.
01:21
It really started going viral.
01:26
It's the first day of the president's job
01:27
and we're basically bringing out as much people
01:29
as we can to say look
01:31
all these people right here,
01:33
they stand with Muslims
01:34
they stand with immigrants
01:34
they stand with women.
01:36
I've dedicated 22 years of my life
01:38
to movement building
01:39
and criminal justice reform.
01:41
I get a call from my dear friend.
01:43
There's this march happening
01:45
and I think you should be a part of it.
01:47
Didn't really realize what we were getting into
01:49
but also felt like this responsibility
01:51
to frame the conversation
01:55
really be intentional.
01:56
When you look at the co-chairs of this march
01:58
and the diversity there,
01:59
our different experiences
02:01
and our different backgrounds,
02:03
even that is fascinating.
02:06
We need to make sure
02:07
that we just keep women of color
02:09
at the forefront
02:10
and that's why I have been trying to make sure
02:12
that on the women's march page
02:14
that we're visually seen.
02:16
It's given a lot of the people involved in it
02:17
a new outlook
02:18
on what female leadership is supposed to look like,
02:21
that it's supposed to be
02:22
inclusive of everybody
02:22
because so often when we think of female leadership,
02:25
it's white women.
02:27
The fact that these women are the faces of it
02:29
paints an entirely new picture for everybody.
02:31
I am Latina.
02:32
I didn't ever see anybody on TV that looked like me.
02:35
It's about the young girls
02:37
that could feel inspired
02:38
by seeing somebody like themselves
02:40
on stage or in a picture,
02:41
whatever it may be.
02:42
It's our responsibility to make that happen.
02:45
When you bring all the voices
02:47
of all the communities together,
02:49
it makes it historic.
02:51
It's always been so hard to organize
02:53
a truly intersectional women's movement
02:55
because we are not a monolith.
02:57
We're half the population
02:58
and our issues are varied
03:00
and all of our privileges
03:02
and lack of privilege
03:03
intersect with each other.
03:05
People are coming with so much frustration and hurt
03:08
and so much aspirations
03:09
for what kind of country
03:10
they want to live in.
03:12
As women are very, very focused
03:14
on the fact that they're going to Washington
03:16
with their issue on their back
03:17
and it's not just women's issues
03:19
it's also the issues
03:20
of how our families and communities are affected.
03:22
So we've invited men to be present with us
03:25
to stand with us
03:26
children, gender non-conforming folks, all people
03:30
because a woman is only the centerpiece
03:33
of so much more that goes on around us.
03:36
If you can fight for women's rights,
03:37
you can fight for rights across the board.
03:40
That's one of the key things,
03:41
this march not being exclusively about women
03:45
it being about everyone
03:47
but centering the most marginalized among us.
03:51
It's wrong what people are going through now in America
03:54
and we must ensure that we do not have
03:57
our rights rolled back.
04:00
This type of endeavor takes months to plan.
04:04
We wanna make sure that everybody knows
04:05
that they need to come
04:07
because it's the way in which
04:09
our administration is gonna pay attention to us,
04:11
to show a huge presence
04:13
which looks like radical resistance.
04:17
I'm hoping what people get out of this march is
04:19
that when you see three of the four national co-chairs
04:22
of the Women's March on Washington,
04:23
which will go down in history,
04:24
are women of color.
04:25
Oftentimes people think,
04:26
oh I can only be an activist
04:28
if I have a certain skill,
04:29
I'm a public speaker
04:30
or I have some charisma
04:31
or I have this certain political ideology
04:34
when in fact
04:35
anybody can be an activist.
04:36
What's your skill?
04:37
What do you know how to do?
04:38
Offer your skills to the movement
04:40
and I'm telling you
04:40
the movement will welcome you
04:41
with open arms.
04:42
It takes less effort
04:44
than people would imagine.
04:46
How we live our lives is ultimately political.
04:49
The personal is the political.
04:50
You're involved whether you like it or not.
04:53
What we're seeing happen today is
04:54
more decentralized leadership.
04:56
that there are a lot of people who are in the movement
04:59
who can carry the message
05:00
carry the torch.
05:01
That is the structure that we see happening
05:03
around this country.
05:05
Through leveraging all
05:07
of our incredibly diverse talents and backgrounds,
05:11
we had this opportunity
05:12
to make a difference
05:13
in a new way.
05:15
If you can take those millions of people
05:17
teach them, organize them,
05:19
and then mobilize them,
05:21
then who knows what we can accomplish together?
05:24
That's what I'm really excited about.