Screen Tests

Episode 82

Emma Watson

Episode 63

Jared Leto

Episode 56

Will Ferrell

Episode 55

Lea Seydoux

Episode 52

Emma Watson

Episode 49

Richard Gere

Episode 47

Joan Smalls

Episode 41

Karlie Kloss

Episode 40

Tom Cruise

Episode 39

Clive Owen

Episode 37

Jessica Biel

Episode 35

Uggie

Episode 34

James Franco

Episode 32

Viola Davis

Episode 31

Jonah Hill

Episode 24

Melissa Leo

Episode 18

Mila Kunis

Episode 16

Mark Ruffalo

Episode 14

Emma Stone

Episode 5

Ruth Negga Can’t Stand When Other People Are Late — Until She’s Late Herself

Irish-Ethiopian actress Ruth Negga became renowned among American audiences first in AMC's "Preacher," then her breakout role in 2016's "Loving," in which she plays one-half of an interracial couple at the heart of a Supreme Court case whose decision would ultimately legalize interracial marriage. In this wide-ranging interview with W editor-at-large Lynn Hirschberg, Negga reveals her biggest pet peeve — tardiness — and how she came to premiere "Loving" two years after her first audition.

Released on 1/26/2017

Credit

Transcript

00:04
I knew about the "Loving" story.
00:06
I'd had an interest in American history
00:08
since I was quite young; just fascinated by this country.
00:14
I felt like I was on a mission to get this part.
00:18
I usually don't go into auditions in character,
00:21
but I knew that in order to...
00:23
I had to sortof disappear into Mildred.
00:27
I think I wore a summer dress.
00:29
I knew that coming in the door as this
00:31
woman would have an impact that
00:34
I needed in order to convince Jeff and Sarah that
00:38
I had the chops for this to eventually play her.
00:41
Gosh, where was I when I heard I got the part?
00:44
When it was a year later, actually.
00:46
Then, we shot a year after that so I auditioned
00:48
for actually two years before we started shooting.
00:51
Cannes was extraordinary because it
00:52
was the first time I had been to the festival.
00:55
It was the first time I had been on the [foreign language]
00:57
and it was a very surreal experience to be
00:59
in this place which I'd seen on television
01:02
and photographs for so many years.
01:03
It was thrilling.
01:04
It really was, you know walking up those steps.
01:06
I walked up in full makeup and
01:08
then I walked down and mascara dripping.
01:11
At the end, the cameras filmed me for a while.
01:13
You're thinking, "Oh! I need to blow my nose
01:16
before it drips all over my frock."
01:19
Cinematic crush?
01:20
[thinking]
01:22
Betty Davis is my cinematic crush. I love her.
01:25
[Producer] Any particular film?
01:26
All About Eve.
01:27
Yeah. I was a teenager and I was just astounded
01:29
by the wish, the comedy of it.
01:32
Fine acting throughout the board and
01:34
the story is just extraordinary.
01:36
It's all about the theater and
01:38
I found that quite interesting.
01:40
I think all the dressing room scenes
01:41
are just fantastic because they're just so familiar.
01:44
You really can smell the grease paint off that film.
01:47
My pet peeve?
01:49
Like about behavior?
01:51
I really resent people late, until I'm late.
01:53
[laughs]
01:55
When you're on stage, the screens,
01:56
screens, blue screens, thin blue screens.
01:59
They're a very present part of the whole
02:01
experience as you're the audience
02:03
so there's a connection there.
02:04
I probably shouldn't be thrown, but
02:05
I do get thrown by things like that.
02:07
I wasn't wild in school.
02:08
I left that til a bit later.
02:10
I was very impatient as an adolescent
02:13
to get that bit over and done with
02:14
so I could go to drama school.
02:17
I used to spend like a lot of time
02:19
in the library reading Sight & Sound
02:20
and trying to, you know learn about the movies.
02:23
Yeah, I think I spent my adolescence
02:25
preparing for adulthood which sounds
02:28
like a waste now, but sure I could use it.