Who Is Your Cin...
Elle Fanning

Episode 22

Rachel Weisz

Episode 21

Richard Gere

Episode 19

Naomi Watts

Episode 18

Ben Affleck

Episode 17

Omar Sy

Episode 16

Jack Black

Episode 14

John Hawkes

Episode 11

Amy Adams

Episode 3

Jane Fonda Talks About Being a Fashion Icon

In a candid Screen Test interview with Editor at Large Lynn Hirschberg, W’s June/ July 2015 issue cover star reveals what it’s like to be a style icon at 77 (“It’s weird”), how Katharine Hepburn was her mentor, and why she finds Robert Redford’s “good values” sexy.

Released on 5/19/2015

Credit

Starring:

Featuring:

Jane Fonda

Lynn Hirschberg

Transcript

00:04
I never wanted to be an actor.
00:05
I think probably because my Dad never seemed
00:08
to enjoy it, although I know he did.
00:10
I know that he loved acting, but he never
00:13
seemed to bring joy home with him.
00:15
I didn't grow up seeing myself as an actor.
00:18
I didn't see myself as being pretty enough or talented.
00:22
I was very, very shy.
00:24
I really became an actor by default
00:25
when I was about 20 years old.
00:27
I had to get a job, and I was a friend
00:29
of Susan Strasberg, Lee Strasberg's daughter.
00:33
I said, I've gotta get a job because I have
00:35
to move out of my father's house
00:36
and get my own apartment, and she said,
00:38
well, why don't you meet my Dad and talk
00:40
to him about being in his private classes?
00:42
So I did.
00:43
I went and I met him.
00:44
I used to sit in the back of the room
00:46
next to Marilyn Monroe, and both of us
00:48
were too scared to ever volunteer
00:50
to go on the stage and do a scene,
00:52
but eventually I did, and he told me I was talented.
00:56
It was just, I guess I was waiting for someone
00:58
to tell me that I had talent because the minute
01:01
that those words came out of his mouth,
01:03
that was what I wanted to do for my rest of my life.
01:07
Barbarella was a French comic book.
01:09
I'd been married to a French film director
01:11
named Roger Vadim for seven years
01:14
when Dino De Laurentiis offered me the part.
01:19
Brigitte Bardot, Vadim's first wife, had turned it down.
01:22
I think Sophia Loren turned it down.
01:25
So I was kinda the fallback choice.
01:28
I guess it had an effect on how people perceived me.
01:30
It certainly didn't have much of an effect on me
01:33
because I promptly left my husband
01:35
and my life in France, and moved back
01:37
to the United States, and became an antiwar activist.
01:40
The only way that Barbarella affected me was
01:42
sometimes I would go to a rally, and there'd be a banner
01:45
that said, come hear Barbarella speak.
01:47
The first movie that really had an impact
01:49
on my life was They Shoot Horses, Don't They?
01:51
It was the first time that I made a movie
01:53
that was a reflection of American society
01:56
in a way that was relevant to that time.
01:58
It was 1968, and even though it was
02:02
about the Depression Era, it was based
02:05
on an existential novel, but it was about something.
02:09
The night that I won my first Academy Award,
02:11
I had 102 degree fever, and I sort of
02:14
thought I was gonna win.
02:15
I mean, everyone said, you're gonna win.
02:18
I remember when they called my name, and I went up there,
02:21
and I said, there's a lot I'd like to say,
02:24
but now isn't the time.
02:25
It was like I could hear,
02:26
[sighing]
02:27
oh, thank God, thank God she didn't make a speech
02:30
about war, and peace, and everything.
02:32
And then I walked offstage and walked
02:34
into a corner and cried.
02:36
It didn't seem right to me that I won
02:39
an Academy Award before my father, with his amazing career,
02:43
and I'm so grateful that he eventually,
02:45
before he died, won an Oscar in On Golden Pond,
02:49
which is a movie that I produced
02:51
so that I could act with him before it was over.
02:55
Katharine Hepburn is a perfect example
02:57
of what an elder should be.
02:59
She took her role as elder stateswoman very seriously.
03:03
She mentored me.
03:05
I think the one that's most pertinent was
03:09
when she came up behind me, I was looking
03:11
in a mirror, combing my hair getting ready for a scene,
03:14
and she came up behind me, and she went like this.
03:16
What do you want this to say about you?
03:19
And I didn't know what she was talking about.
03:21
And she said, this is your container.
03:23
How do you want that to represent you in the world?
03:26
And what she was saying is, you need
03:29
to think more about your presentation.
03:33
How do you want yourself seen in the world?
03:35
Because, at the time, I didn't give it a faretheewell,
03:40
not the way I looked, not my hair,
03:42
not my makeup, not my clothes.
03:44
And it made her mad that I didn't.
03:47
And it took me a very long time
03:49
to make peace with the need to present myself.
03:53
It's weird, at my age, that people think
03:57
that I dress well, and that I look good.
04:00
I mean, I think it's kind of neat
04:02
that I'm in my 70s before somebody says,
04:05
oh, she's great on the red carpet, and she's a fashion icon.
04:09
Moi?
04:10
I hardly think so, but I've learned to fake it.
04:13
[laughing]
04:14
Fooled them again.